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Fr Geoffrey Sweeney WF
Fr Christopher O'Doherty
Fr Tom McIllveney WF
Fr Jimmy Wallace
Fr Vincent Bailey
Fr Pat Boyd



Father Geoffrey Sweeney WF 1918 - 2004

Some of you will remember Fr Sweeney from his short stay at St Columba's and The Priory — and all of us will be happy to learn that he lived such a long and fruitful life.

Adapted from the entry in the international website of the White Fathers :

Fr Sweeney died 11th December in St. Martha? Hospice Clydebank, at the age of 86 — having spent 62 years as a missionary in Tanzania and the United Kingdom.

May he rest in peace. Please pray for Geoff and his family and all of those who knew him during this time of grieving
Nationality : British
Diocèse d'origine
Leeds
Place of Birth :
Heaton,Bradford
23-03-1918
Année Spirituelle:
Maison-Carrée
01-10-1938
Missionary Oath :
Carthage
27-06-1942
Ordination :
Edinburgh
19-06-1943

Date
Duty/ Office
Location
Country
01-07-1943
  Birmingham
G.B.
01-01-1944
  Heston
 
01-01-1945

Bishop's Waltham
 
01-01-1946
  Heston  
03-12-1945
  Kajunguti,V.Bukoba
Tanzania
13-06-1947
Ecole d'Anglais
Ihungo
 
02-11-1949
Econome
Buhororo
 
27-09-1952
Seminary
Rubya
 
13-12-1953
School
Ihungo
 
17-07-1954
  Kajunguti
 
16-01-1956
  Bishop's Waltham
G.B.
01-07-1956
  St Boswells
 
16-12-1957
Seminary Rubya Tanzania
01-01-1959
  Itahwa
 
08-03-1960
  Bugene,D.Bukoba
 
01-01-1963
Seminary Rubya  
01-12-1964
  St Boswells
G.B.
01-01-1966
Seminary Rubya Tanzania
01-01-1968
  Kashozi
 
01-11-1968
Superior Bunena
 
01-12-1970
Curate
Kashambya
 
01-08-1971
Curate
Ngote
 
01-10-1971
Curate
Kashambya  
01-11-1971
Curate
Ichwandimi
 
01-09-1977
Curate
Rukindo
 
01-01-1979
Curate
Itamuka,D.Singida
 
01-01-1985

Ilongero  
30-10-1987
Guestmaster
Nyegezi Reg. House
 
01-12-1989
Curate
Chemchem,D.Singida
 
01-07-1990
Curate
Singida,D.Singida
 
01-07-1996
Nommé (P.E.96/7)
  G.B.
15-09-1996
Chaplain H.C.:
London,Hammersmith
 
01-11-2001
Ministry
Preston
 
01-12-2003
Residence
Rutherglen
 
11-12-2004
Retour au Seigneur (86) à Clydebank
G.B.

Tribute to Fr Sweeney

by Fr Peter D Smith WF, Provincial


'As a tree lies so shall it fall.'
One reads in the earliest reports made about Geoff how he was naturally modest and conscientious. One remark in his early training reads 'how thoroughly good and obedient, how humble and reliable he is'. The Geoff I was to come to know forty or fifty years later in Tanzania was a true echo of those early remarks. This is not surprising when you consider his family background. His mother came from Co. Cork (Ireland) and his father was a Yorkshireman (England). He had three brothers and two sisters. There was good Yorkshire grit and solid Irish piety in that early shoot that saw the light of day on the 23rd March 1918.

Geoff's early education got off to a good start in St Cuthbert's and St Bede's, Bradford. The tombs of these two great saints are prominently displayed in Durham Cathedral today. Then Geoff left St Bede's to go to The Priory where he completed his secondary education in 1936. After that, he was shaped in the White Father mould through his studies of philosophy in Autreppe 1936-38, then his Novitiate in Maison Carrée 1938-39 and his scholasticate in Carthage 1939-43.

On June 19th 1943, Geoff was ordained priest in Edinburgh. His desire 'to get to the Missions' immediately was thwarted by the war. He was able to help out at Sutton Coldfield and The Priory. In 1945 he managed to leave for what was then Tanganyika. For the next fifty years he worked in that country interspersed with very few spells at home in Britain. Geoff has penned his own story of those days and it appeared in the White Father/White Sister magazine of the British Province issue no. 350, Feb-March 2000. (Cf.www.thewhitefathers.org.uk).

From 1945 until 1980, Geoff worked in Bukoba Diocese. At heart he was a pastoral man. He liked nothing more than to be with God's people, celebrating the sacramental life as teacher, preacher and good counsellor. To his chagrin, he was asked to become licensed as a teacher and was frequently appointed to the seminary or secondary schools of the Diocese. At Rubya he taught with his great friend Tommy McIlveney who died earlier this year. (Petit Echo 2005/1, p. 51) Unlike Tommy, who was a born teacher, Geoff could never get back quickly enough to parish life. Kajunguti, Buhororo, Itahwa, Rubya parish, and Kashozi . . . these are the places where Geoff served. All of them were coming of age in self-sufficiency so that by the early eighties Geoff and his predecessors had successfully worked themselves out of a job.

Geoff then moved to Singida Diocese where he worked in Itamuka, Ilongero, Chemchem and Singida. The situation in Singida was quite different from that of Bukoba. Life was much more of a struggle. The physical climate was harsher while the church structures were only beginning to develop. At the age of 62, Geoff took to the new situation like a duck to water. His little white Suzuki was a familiar sight on the rough roads. Geoff was always willing to give a lift or take somebody to hospital. He grew to love the people and they loved him. He was particularly close to the local diocesan clergy.

For a while from 1987-90, he was asked to take over as guestmaster at the Regional House in Nyegezi and his unassuming manner and spirit of hospitality endeared him to all the confreres who passed through there.

In 1993, Geoff celebrated his Golden Jubilee in Rutherglen with all the confreres. He also returned to Tanzania that year, but by 1995, he was beginning to show signs of wear and tear. He had to return home for treatment first of all for a cataract operation. He then began to suffer from swelling and excess fluid in his legs. For such an active man, it was a real cross for Geoff to accept being confined to bed and having his activities restricted.

As his condition improved, he took up chaplaincy work at Nazareth House, Hammersmith, initially for a period of three months, still expecting to go back to Tanzania.

It became clear that a return to Tanzania was not advisable and the three-month commitment developed into a seven-year appointment. The elderly in the nursing home as well as the staff really appreciated his caring ministry, but it was Geoff himself who felt that he was 'no longer giving value for money'. The nursing staff and sisters would have loved him to stay on, but Geoff felt it was time for someone to replace him who could do the job properly!

And so he went up to Preston to make up the community there. The one thing he had missed in Nazareth House was the White Father community life, though he did receive plenty of visitors. From Preston Geoff loved to go out to the countryside or the seaside. Unfortunately, he was experiencing more and more difficulty in walking, an exercise which he loved. We began to think that Rutherglen might be more suited to Geoff's needs, and so in 2003, he moved up to Glasgow. He integrated well into the community there and he found life very prayerful and congenial with a good community spirit. Geoff's homilies were patently well-prepared and written out beforehand. His spirit of adventure never left him and he was well able to take the bus and go up to Loch Lomond or Dunoon for the day. He always came back from his trips with a convivial gift for the community. He treasured his independence.

But sicknesses were beginning to undermine that independence. The medicine he had to take for his heart and various infections began to affect him adversely. He had to be admitted to hospital where the doctors were able to diagnose problems with the kidney and the heart and then cancer of the lymph glands. Geoff put up a good fight and actually seemed to be getting better. He had been singing songs in German and in French much to the consternation of the others in the ward. Just a day or so after he was released from hospital to go into the Hospice in Clydebank, God finally called him to Himself. Being the good and obedient man that he was Geoff said yes, at peace with all around him.

His funeral Mass was celebrated in St Columkille's, Rutherglen on Thursday 16th December. Chris Wallbank was the main celebrant at the Mass. The Provincial preached the homily. Fr Oliver (Ollie) O'Brien, the Provincial of the Pallottine Fathers in Tanzania, came over to pay his respects and say a few words. He had worked with Geoff in Singida under many a gruelling sun. Fr Jimmy Barry, Geoff's old comrade-in-arms through all the years of training, gave the final commendation in the Church. Christine, Geoff's niece, was able to be there at the Mass and the graveside. Bad weather prevented Elizabeth, his other niece, from arriving in time for the funeral.

He was buried in our plot at Burnside Cemetery. Afterwards we gathered in our house in Rutherglen to share a joyous meal of thanksgiving for a wonderful confrere and a dedicated missionary.

Requiescat in pace

Peter D. Smith
Provincial


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Father Christopher O'Doherty WF 1923 - 2004

Adapted from the entry in the international website of the White Fathers





With regret we inform you of the death of our confrère, Father Christopher O'Doherty, who died at the age of 80, having spent 55 years as a missionary in Tanzania, the Netherlands and Ireland.

Fr. Christopher O'Doherty died in the evening of 25th August 2004.

He had been complaining of abdominal and lower back pain for some time and, on the advice of his doctor, was referred to the local hospital for tests on 9th August. These tests showed that he had a number of medical problems, due to medical complications from the time he worked in Africa.

 

Nationality : Irish
Diocèse d'origine
Limerick
Birthplace :
Killmallock
20-12-1923
Année Spirituelle
Dorking
02-10-1946
Missionary Oath :
's-Heerenberg
29-10-1948
Ordination :
's-Heerenberg
11-06-1949

Date
Role / Office
Location
Country
01-09-1949
Etudes Roma Italia
03-09-1951
Prof 's-Heerenberg
Nederland
01-01-1959
  Bujora,D.Mwanza
Tanganyika
01-01-1961
Prof Nyegezi,Seminary
 
18-05-1963
Grande Retraite
Villa Cavalletti
Italia
01-07-1963
Superior
Dublin,Templeogue
Ireland
06-11-1965

Blacklion
 
01-10-1969
Conseiller Provinc.    
01-10-1969 Départ pour
  Tanzania
01-04-1971
Vicaire
Nansio,D.Mwanza
 
01-04-1972
Supérieur
Nansio
 
01-07-1973
Vicaire
Mwanza Cathedral
 
01-01-1975

Dublin,Templeogue Ireland
01-01-1986
Econome Provincial
Dublin,Templeogue
 
14-09-1986
Délégué au Chapitre
   
17-10-1987
Magazine/Media
Dublin,Templeogue
 
19-10-2000
Residence
Dublin,Templeogue
 
25-08-2004
Retour au Seigneur (80) Dublin
 

Fr. Chris O'Doherty
by Eugene MacBride


Fr. Chris 0' Doherty (Fr. Christy to his family) was a man of many talents. And, like the wise servants who had received the talents from their master in St. Matthew's Gospel [Mt.25: 1423], Fr. Chris shared and used the gifts he had received from God for the benefit of others.

Fr. Chris was born on 20th December 1923 in Kilmallock, Co. Limerick. In 1937 he began his secondary school studies at the White Fathers' seminary in Bishops Waltham, England. When war broke out in 1939, he returned to Ireland and completed his secondary school education in Mungret College, Limerick. When he had finished his philosophical studies, Fr. Chris returned to England to study theology. For his final year he was sent to The Netherlands where he was ordained priest on 11 June 1949.

During his years of formation, it was noted that Fr. Chris had a very keen academic mind. Therefore it came as no surprise when, after his ordination, he was appointed to Rome for further studies. In 1951 he obtained his Doctorate in Philosophy and returned to The Netherlands as a member of staff of our formation house there.  Finally, in 1951, Fr. Chris was appointed to Africa. His first posting was to the Diocese of Mwanza in Tanzania where, in his own words, he acquired a passable knowledge of the local language, Kisuma.

Fr. Chris' arrived in Tanzania at a time when there was rapid growth in the Church and a need for structures to support this new development. The Bishop of the diocese recognised that Fr. Chris had a talent for building and organisation, and appointed him to a large building project. In the subsequent years, Fr. Chris supervised the construction of many buildings in the Diocese.

In 1963, Fr. Chris was appointed back to Ireland to found a house for priest students who were to study at UCD. The large house which we still own in Cypress Grove was acquired. Fr. Chris, assisted by a team of Brothers, set about sub-dividing the large bedrooms so that they could eventually accommodate twenty students. When this phase of the work was finished, Fr. Chris set his sights on the outbuildings at the back of the house. The garages, turf shed, stable, and grain loft were soon converted into a chapel and more student rooms.

When all this work was finished, Fr. Chris was able to return to his first love—teaching. He was appointed to our house of studies in BlackIion and taught Philosophy there for the next four years. One of those whom he taught during that time remembers him as a very enthusiastic teacher who was keen to impart his love of philosophy to his students. It was while he was at BlackIion that Fr. Chris took up golf, a sport he still enjoyed playing when wen into his 70s.

Then in 1970, he returned to the Diocese of Mwanza. In addition his parish ministry, he set up organisations to enable lay people to teach religion in the primary and secondary schools in the area. This idyllic situation did not last long for Fr. Chris was appointed back to Ireland in 1975 to be director of students. During this time he also gave lectures in Philosophy at Kimmage Manor and at the Milltown Institute.

In the early 1980s, Fr. Chris began to delve into the relatively new world of personal computers. It was not long before he was proficient in this newly acquired talent and, for the next twenty or so years, he produced many publications such as the Newsletter and the Desk Diary.

Heart by-pass surgery in 1990 obliged Fr. Chris to cut back on his work load but it also allowed his more time to indulge in one of his life-long hobbies—gardening. He spent many happy hours tending the grounds of our house in Templeogue.

In the few months leading up to his death, people noticed that Fr. Chris's health was deteriorating. In the second week of August he was admitted to Tallaght for tests and treatment. Sadly he never left hospital. He died peacefully in the evening of 25th August, surrounded and supported by family and friends.

At the request of his family, Fr. Chris' funeral Mass took place in his home town of Kilmallock. He was then laid to rest in the grounds of the Church in which he had been baptised just over eighty years previously. The circle was complete.



A Personal Appreciation of Fr O'Doherty by John Byrne

Father Christopher O’Doherty’s ‘Curriculum Vitae’ speaks volumes for him as a dedicated priest who served the White Fathers Society for 55 years. What I would like to say in his memory amounts to a personal reflection – though not too solemn.

My first memories of Fr Chris O’Doherty (Fr Chris as he became known to my children), go back to my period as a student of Philosophy in Blacklion in 1965. Always on the go, always very approachable, am man with a good sense of humour and seemingly full of energy. I remember his classes, naturally, though with the passage of 40 years, not in detail.

A couple of ‘incidents’ spring to mind. The first was his laying of concrete paths around the recently constructed chapel and common room in 1966. He had worked tirelessly with the help of most of the students, and had finally achieved a perfect surface finish. Overnight, footprints had appeared in the drying cement, and to all intents and purposes they were ‘human.’ While Fr Chris was less than pleased he didn’t rush to judgement, rather went about seeking the culprit in his own measured way. This was just as well, as the culprit was no other than the college’s donkey ‘Hannibal’. Hannibal’s hoofs were long overdue attention and the hoof prints resembled those of a human.

I also remember standing outside the refectory with a group of confrères looking incredulously at Bro. John (Paddy) Leonard (also of happy memory) explaining how he had married the front of one make of tractor with the rear of another. In his haste to let us see his work, Paddy had secured the rear wheels with a couple of nuts which he had obviously secured by hand. Fr Chris appeared and was closely scrutinising Paddy’s work when one of the wheels began to move sideways, eventually falling off, as the tractor slowly fell sideways – Fr Chris just walked away – what was in his mind I could but speculate – but I bet I wasn’t far out.

Lastly on a flippant note. At the time, Fr Chris had a dark green Triumph Mayflower car, dating from the 1950’s. He had lovingly restored it, and I was privileged to go with him down the road towards Blacklion village, and into the golf club. I can’t remember if I was playing (I doubt it as I couldn’t then – nor now – hit a golf ball in its intended direction) or caddying for him. In any event, the Mayflower had been off the road undergoing restoration, for some time, and Fr Chris needed a document to that effect signed by the Gardaí. He saw the local sergeant coming towards the car, and without a flinch said, “Mick, would you ever mind signing this thing to say that I haven’t been using the car?” “Of course, Father,” came the reply as the sergeant signed the document, resting on still warm the bonnet of the car!!!

Living near Templeogue on my return to Ireland in 1972, whenever I wanted a mass card signed, I used to go to Cypress Grove (where else?). I met Fr Chris often, and we kind of kept in touch off and on. I joined the Irish Government training authority in 1985, and during the recruitment process, asked Fr Chris for a letter testifying that I had not been in jail from 1965 – 1967; or more correctly that I had been a student of the White Fathers during that period. He duly obliged, and detailed all the subjects I had studied, including Criteriology and Epistemology to name but two. This came back to haunt me as at interview I was asked to explain the terms – I fluffed my way through an answer. He also practiced “Caritas” to the limit stating how my training with the White Fathers had prepared me for a career as a businessman. (I could never fathom out the connection ; he could, and that was all that mattered).

Anyway I got the job, and was able to point him in something of a right direction as he threw himself with his customary zeal into learning to use computers. My eldest son died in 1986, and the support from the community in Templeogue, notably Fr Ciaran McGuinness with whom I had studied, was comforting. Fr Chris came to the house to celebrate mass with my family. It remains a memorable and cherished occasion, punctuated as it was with his deep sense of the occasion as well as his own inimitable storytelling.

Our contacts became rare thereafter, and sadly I have not enjoyed the best of health in the past two years. Recently, I was ‘surfing’ the internet and went into the White Fathers’ website, it was there I learned with great sadness that Fr Chris had returned to the Lord, on 25th August 2004, aged 80 years.
God rest you Fr Chris, and until we meet again . . . . Go ndéana Dia trócaire ar a ainm.


May he rest In Peace


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Father Tom McIllveney WF 1914 - 2004

Adapted from the entry in the international website of the White Fathers



With regret we inform you of the death of our confrère , Father Tom McIlveney, who passed away in his sleep 30th August 2004. May he rest in peace. He was 90 years of age and had spent 64 years as a missionary in Tanzania and the United Kingdom.

Nationality : British
Diocèse d'origine
Glasgow
Birthplace :
Dumbarton
14-06-1914
Année Spirituelle
Maison-Carrée
03-10-1936
Missionary Oath :
Maison-Carrée
10-07-1940
Ordination :
Carthage
12-04-1941


Date
Role / Office
Location
Country
19-11-1942
    G.B.
15-01-1943
  Birmingham
 
06-11-1943
  Heston
 
15-03-1944
Vicaire
Rubya,V.Bukoba
Tanganyika
01-08-1947
Vicaire Ngote
 
01-01-1948
  Ihungo
 
27-12-1948
Prof.
Rubya,Seminary
 
20-12-1952
Vicaire
Kashozi
 
09-02-1953
Vicaire
Katoke
 
11-01-1954
Prof Rubya,Seminary  
03-04-1954
Grande Retraite
   
10-05-1955
Vicaire Kajunguti
 
05-10-1955
Prof.
Rubya,Seminary  
01-01-1966
Chaplain
Ihungo  
01-01-1967
Prof.
Rubya,Seminary  
01-01-1970
Supérieur Rubya,Seminary  
01-12-1970
Prof. (pas Sup.)
Rubya,Seminary  
03-07-1980
Retired
Rutherglen
G.B.
30-08-2004
Retour au Seigneur (90) à Rutherglen
 

Taken from The White Fathers - White Sisters magazine, Issue 381 April-May 2005

Born in 1914, Fr. Tommy completed his secondary schooling in his home town of Dumbarton before joining the White Fathers. He came from a close loving family who gave him all possible support in his missionary calling. After initial formation he was sent to North Africa and made his noviciate at Maison Carree in 1936 and completed his theological studies at Carthage where he was ordained priest in 1941. During this time he had shown himself to be a man of sound spiritual qualities, intelligent and gentle in character.

After his ordination he returned to the province where he remained for three years helping out at the promotion centre and the parish of Heston. In 1944 he received his appointment to Tanzania and the diocese of Bukoba where he was to remain until 1980. Fr. Tommy spoke little of these long years spent in Tanzania. One gets the impression that he was happy and content to be left alone to get on with the work entrusted to him. Initially this was pastoral ministry for a few years but soon, like many native English speakers at that firne, he found himself assigned to teaching duties. From 1948 until his refirement in 1980, Fr. Tommy faithfully taught English, Geography, and anything else asked of him, at Rubya seminary. Many of those young men he taught went on to become priests and bishops and while Fr. Tommy could not tell you how many diocesan priests whom he had taught he took great pride in counting the number of bishops who had sat at his feet. In later years a good number of his former pupils kept in touch with him and those of us who met them heard them testify to Fr. Tommy's good solid teaching, sound advice and discipline !

Even in his retirernent years Fr. Tommy was always on time for meals, meetings and other community activities and did not tolerate easily those, who were late. Testimony is also given by his ex-pupils to his faithfulness to his spiritual exercises which proved a great example to them. And again in his years of retirement he was faithful to community prayer and the days of recollection, even when his health was failing. His home leaves were always spent with his family in Dumbarton and after the death of his parents with his sisters, of whom he was very fond.

Often, it seems, the provincial did not know Fr. Tommy had been home. He came and went quietly, unobtrusively and it was remarked at his funeral, he might have made a good secret agent! In retirement when he did speak of these long years of unromantic and mundaneteaching, Fr. Tommy did so without any resentment and it is evident that he appreciated and valued the contribution he had been privileged to make to the growth of the church in Tanzania. This was quite in accord with the spirit and instructions of Cardinal Lavigerie.

This long career came to a sudden end in 1980 when he returned home on sick leave and was advised not to return. Fr. Tommy accepted this unquestioningly as God's will and after a long rest with his family he took up residence in Rutherglen. At the beginning he found it difficult to settle into the rhythm of life there but being a man of routine he eventually established his own programme. Once a week, faithful as clockwork, he left the house and took the train to visit his sisters in Dumbarton. Always the same time; the same train; the same lunch together; and back at the same time. These visits were important to him and his sisters and when he could no longer visit they came regularly to see him.

In the community Fr. Tommy readily accepted to render small servicessuch as looking after the library and the sacristy. His lack of pastoral experience left him with little confidence, however, to become involved in the outside activities of the community such as missionary appeals or helping in the local parishes. Nonetheless, Fr. Tommy was content with his family visits, his reading, his classical music and his television programmes. As he grew older his health deteriorated and he often fell or suffered small strokes but with amazing regularity and rapidity he bounced back and was soon at table again with his mischievous smile, wicked sense of humour and on time!

Happily Fr. Tommy was well enough to be present at the funerals of his two sisters, whose passing marked him deeply. In June he celebrated his ninetieth birthday with a party for his nieces and their families and members of the community. Ever his "own man" he left the party when he was ready.

Shortly afterwards a more serious fall left him weak and badly bruised. On the advice of the doctors he was admitted to the hospital where he was to remain until his death. At times he seemed to get stronger and enjoyed watching the football and the Olympics and even spoke of coming home but in his heart knew it was not to be. He joyfully received the Sacrament of the Sick, first with members of his community and again the day before he died in the presence of his family. Conscious to the end, he received the news of Fr Tod O'Donnell's death with a nod and smile and one got the impression that he knew his own death was imminent. He died peacefully in his sleep just six hours later.

Fr. Tommy's funeral Mass was attended by members of his family, confrères, and many of the local community. He is buried in the community plot in Rutherglen.


May he rest In Peace

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Father Jimmy Wallace - 2005
Taken from an email sent by Peter Finn 28th August 2005





Dear Fellow-Pelicans
 
It is with great sadness that I learnt today of the death of my good friend and yours - Father Jimmy Wallace.
 
His parish treasurer, Charles Conlon, called to tell me that he died early on Friday morning 26 August while sitting in his chair - apparently of a heart attack. He said Mass on the previous Sunday, but had not felt well enough to say Mass from Monday onwards.

The funeral Mass will be on Thursday 1st September in his own church, St Bernadette's in Tullibody, Clackmannanshire. He will be buried in Alloa.



(source : Pat Menzies)

Very briefly. From the Priory, he went on to study philosophy at Broome Hall. He left Broome Hall and was accepted by the diocese of Northampton.

After ordination he was sent to Cambridge University (Gonville and Caius) where he graduated in history. After some years teaching and as a curate, he went to work as a parish priest in Nova Scotia. On his return he became parish priest in Tullibody.


He was a man of strong affections and strong opinions, especially relating to the church he loved so much. He was a great devotee of Our Blessed Lady, and his lifelong project was visiting as many shrines of Our Lady around the world as he could. He was accompanied on very many of these pilgrimages by Hugh (Shed) Campbell until he was too ill to travel.

His great pleasure from his Priory days was the operas of Gilbert and Sullivan. A life member of a Savoy Opera association, he continued to produce and direct until recent years, and even acted in shows in London when called upon by his great friend the late John Baker.  A brilliant mimic, sharp wit, and ardent choir master, he would have been a marvellous actor-producer, but he was chosen instead to serve as Alter Christus, which he faithfully did for nearly fifty years.
 
He was a very great believer in the power of prayer. Let us remember him in our prayers.
 
Peter 


Email from Margaret Baker    
September 3rd 2005

I had a phone call from Father Jim Wallace's sister about his sudden death.
Her phone number is 01375674553. As yet, I haven't been able to get through but have sent a Mass card.

John, my husband and Jim were great buddies in the seminary and loved to recall the Gilbert & Sullivan productions.

Jim lived with us for several months when times were hard for him. In the end things worked out and I think he was happy in Tullibody.

The family remember him with affection.



Margaret Baker


Email from Pat Menzies  
September 4th 2005


Pelicans will have read in the Obituaries about the passing of Fr. James Wallace who was Parish priest of Tullibody in Clacks, Scotland.

Jimmy died on Friday 26th August and was buried on Thursday, 1st September. Two of us who were his buddies at the Priory, myself and Robert Clyde , attended the funeral along with my wife Pauline and Robert's wife Jessie.
Two requiem masses were said in his Parish of St. Bernadette's,Tullibody. The church was packed on both occasions with family members, friends and parishioners as well as members of the clergy.

I had the opportunity to meet with his family again after a break of many years. I conveyed to them our condolences and that of the Pelicans who knew him. There were many tributes paid to him all of which were well deserved and it was obvious from the crowds who turned up for his funeral that he was a very popular priest.

















I visited him a week before he died and spent a few hours with him reminiscing about our days at the Priory. I was very impressed with his detailed memories of those days which must have been some of his happiest.

The announcement of his death shortly after my visit came as a great shock. I was grateful that we had those few hours together. A great man, a great parish priest and a great buddy.







May he rest In Peace

Pat Menzies


Letter from Bob Clyde   
September 7th 2005

I enclose a photo of Fr James Wallace, whose death was noted on the website. Pat and Pauline Menzies and Jessie and I attended the funeral. His body was brought into the parish church of St Bernadette's, Tullibody, on Tuesday evening (30th August). Mass was held on Wednesday evening, and the church was packed for the service. On the following day (Thursday), the bishop and many of his fellow priests concelebrated Mass.

The church was packed, with many people following the service from the church grounds. The great numbers who attended the services reflected the great affection in which Fr Wallace was held. The police were out in force to ensure the cortege had a smooth journey to the cemetery in Alloa.

Fr Jim was ordained in July 1957. His priestly life was spent in many parts of the UK and abroad. Northampton was his home diocese, with time spent in parish work and acting as chaplain to Lowestoft prison. He also worked in Nova Scotia for 4 years and the Glasgow Archdiocese, before moving to Dunkeld. I believe that he felt that he had 'come home' when he returned to work in Scotland.

May his soul rest In Peace
Bob Clyde



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Father Vincent Bailey 1937 - 2005
Partly taken from The White Fathers' international website


From Father André Schaminée Delegate Superior, Intercontinental Section :

"With regret I inform you of the death of our confrère Vincent Bailey, M. Afr, aged 68 and in his 41st year as a missionary in Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, Brazil and Great Britain.


It is with great sadness that I have to announce to you the death of Vincent Bailey in Curitiba. Vincent died a few hours ago, Monday 14th November in the early hours of the evening Brazilian time.

Though his death does not come unexpectedly, it is all the same a shock. We have been hoping against hope that the miracle would happen and that he would recover. But this has unfortunately not happened.

May he rest in peace."


The funeral was held on Wednesday 16th November in the church at Pinhais of which Vincent was parish priest.

Let us pray for Vincent, his relatives (two of his brothers and a sister are presently in Curitiba), his community and his parish.

 

Fr Vincent Bailey
1937-2005
A Tribute From His Colleagues

Vincent was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on the 28th of April 1937. His parents were both schoolteachers with that deep West of Scotland Catholic faith that permeated their lives and that they passed on to their children. He was brought up in a council house in Ruchill and he never forgot his roots. He had no sympathy for the class system or for the social inequalities in Britain or wherever else the poor were crushed and the rich feted. He had two brothers and one sister. He was a good sportsman, an excellent golfer and a keen fisherman.

He took an Honours Degree at Glasgow University before joining the White Fathers philosophy house in Blacklion, Ireland, in September 1958. From there he went to Dorking, England, for his Novitiate and then on to Totteridge for his Theology. He was ordained to the Priesthood in Glasgow on the 29th of June 1965. After a year in London doing a Teacher Training Course, he left for Uganda in 1966.

Perhaps what marked out Vincent’s life more than anything else was his radical option for the poor. He was convinced that if we cannot recognise the face of God in the faces of the poor, the sick, the unemployed, the despised, the refugees, the outcasts, how are we going to be able to recognise Him when we meet Him in His Glory? For Vincent, the account of the Final Judgement in Matthew 25 was the yardstick by which to judge the worth of his life and indeed of every Christian’s life.

Sharing with the poor came easily to him and he rarely passed a beggar without helping him or her. He gave without flourish and without questioning the integrity of the one he helped. There were no accusations, nor were there any apologies, nor did he defend his own actions. There were times when this radical option for the poor met opposition from Superiors, especially when he questioned some of the grand houses in which we live. With his big heart for the poor and the downtrodden, Vincent was always going to make a very good Missionary of Africa. And he duly did.

But he had another outstanding quality which not all missionaries possess and which enabled him to respond to the hugely demanding diversity of missionary calls in his life. Some would call this quality ‘disponibilité’ or, perhaps, adaptability; a few might call it obedience. But maybe it could best be described as versatility. Just as in a football team you sometimes have a player who can play in practically any position, so with Vincent you had a missionary who was available for all manner of missionary tasks. He did not spend his missionary life in just one country. Nor was he afraid of taking on new languages or of volunteering for an apostolate for which he had not been specially prepared.

He began his stint in Africa with six years in Uganda. He learned a local language and taught in secondary schools in Kisubi and in Gulu. He was also for a brief time a lecturer in Katigondo Major Seminary. In 1972, he was recalled to Britain to take over as Rector at Totteridge.

In 1976, he went back to Africa. Because of the political situation in Uganda, he was unable to return there. Instead, he went to Tanzania, a neighbouring East African country, where he had to learn Swahili. He worked in missions in Kigoma Diocese at Mulera and Kabanga. He also taught in our Seminary at Kahangala in (now) Mwanza Archdiocese and served for a few years as Assistant Regional for the western part of the country.

In 1985, he was asked to learn Portuguese and go off to Mozambique to become Rector in Maputo Major Seminary in Southern Africa Province. He toiled there for nine years and in 1994 went to a rural mission in Chimoio Diocese called Soalpo where he expected to serve out the remainder of his missionary life gracefully.

However, this was not to be. In 1999, the Society needed him in Brazil and as usual he responded positively. After a few years in the Curitiba project, he took over as Parish Priest in Pinhais in January 2004. This was to be his final mission where he died on the 14th November 2005.

It was only in July 2005 that there were the first indications that Vincent had a health problem. He went into hospital complaining of chest pains and it was decided that he needed a heart operation. At first, it seemed a very routine affair and that all had gone well. But in October he was once again forced to return to hospital for repair; sadly he was never to come out alive. He was not someone to make a great fuss about himself; and true to form, he quietly passed away. Mercifully, his sister and two brothers were able to be in Curitiba during Vincent’s final weeks and were very consoled by being able to attend his Funeral Mass, which fittingly took place on the 16th November, the Feast of St Margaret of Scotland.

From André Schaminée, M.Afr
(via Fr Gerry Stones and Eric Creaney)

"It is with great sadness that I have to announce to you the death of our confrère Vincent Bailey, which occurred in Curitiba on Monday 14th November in the early evening Brazilian time.

We all knew that for some time Vincent was very gravely ill. In the past few weeks he had undergone two heart operations, and though these were initially successful, other
complications set in, such as pneumonia, kidney failure, breathing difficulties etc., which in the end led to his demise.

We express our deepest feelings of sympathy and our heartfelt condolences to Vincent's relatives (two of his brothers and a sister have been in Curitiba for the past few weeks), and especially to the Curitiba Community, who have lost a very committed member. We also extend our sympathies to the British and SAP Provinces, particularly to Mozambique, where Vincent has been working as a missionary for many years.

We know in faith that the Good Lord has welcomed Vincent into His presence with the words, "well done, good and faithful servant, enter into the joys of my Kingdom". May the same Lord also console all of us who now grief at his passing and in particular give strength to Vincent's family and Curitiba community.

Memories of Vincent— from Mike Mearns, a contemporary of Vincent's during his training for the priesthood with the White Fathers:

"Vince was the Dean of students when I began my first year of philosphy at Blacklion. He had taken his MA and taught for a while before joining up. Always cheerful and willing to help others. I took over from him as MC late in my first year and appreciated his help and encouragement. He acquired the nickname of " Bedrock" as a result of his overseeing the the landscaping of the Grotto, where the stream flowed past the statue of the Virgin. Manys a boulder have I rolled, and wheelbarrow load of soil pushed, alongside Vince.

I recall a little talk he gave one Sunday evening in the rec' room. Drawing on his pre-philosophy studies, he entertained us with a recounting of some of the Norse and Icelandic myths. He also inspired me to take up rowing when I left the WFs. He had his blue from Glasgow University and spoke about rowing with such enthusiasm that I had to give it a try when the opportunity arose. So thanks, Vince, for all the times I have slogged up and down the Thames, pulling on an oar in the number five seat of a Kensington Rowing Club eight! "

Nationality: British
Diocese: Glasgow
Born
Glasgow
28-04-1937

Spititual Year
Broome Hall
08-09-1961

Taking of the Oath
Totteridge
29-06-1964
Ordination
Glasgow
29-06-1965
Date
Function
Location
Country
01-10-1965
Studies
London
G.B.
26-10-1966
Arrive à
Nandere,D.Kampala
Uganda
31-01-1968
Gr.Séminaire
Katigondo
 
10-04-1968
Retour à
Nandere,D.Kampala  
28-01-1969
  Kisubi,Higher
 
01-02-1970
Collège se déplace à
Gulu
 
30-05-1972
Superior
Totteridge
G.B.
30-06-1972
Elu Conseiller Prov.
   
30-06-1975
Elu Conseiller Prov.
   
01-05-1976
Vicaire
Mulera,D.Kigoma
Tanzania
01-09-1977
Superior
Kabanga
 
01-11-1980
Délégué au Chapitre
   
24-06-1981
Ast.Rég.
Kabanga  
01-09-1985
Recteur&Vicaire
Maputo Séminaire
Moçambique
01-09-1994
Coadjutor
Soalpo,D.Chiumoio
 
01-01-1999
Formation+Parish
Curitiba
Inc./Brasil
01-01-2004
Parish Priest
Curitiba
 
14-11-2005
Retour au Seigneur (68) Curitiba
Brasil

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Father Patrick Boyd 1919 - 2005
Partly taken from The White Fathers' international website




From Fr Peter D. Smith, British Provincial :

With regret we inform you of the death of our confrère Father Patrick Boyd, 27th September 2005 at Victoria Hospital Great Britain. He was aged 85 and in his 58th year as a Missionary in Zambia and the UK.

Kindly remember him in your prayers, together with his family and all those he left behind.

May he rest in peace.


Our thanks to Fr Boyd's colleagues for the following tribute :

Born on 28th December 1919
Pat was one of sixteen children born to Thomas and Isabella Boyd. He was in fact the thirteenth child and those who are superstitious might say this accounted for the fact that during his lifetime Pat was the victim of many unforeseen circumstances and illnesses! Something that Pat took even naturedly and with good humour.

Of those sixteen children eleven lived long and healthy lives in various parts of the globe, Australia, America and Scotland not to mention the many years Pat himself spent in Zambia. At his funeral his brother, Canon George Boyd of Motherwell Diocese was the main celebrant and in the church their other remaining brother Andrew was present while their sole surviving sister was present in spirit from her home in Australia. In Church too were a large gathering of nephews and nieces and grand nephews and nieces to whom Pat was very close and all of whom gave Pat great support and strength in his years of retirement and in the days of his final illness.

Coming from a large family was perhaps one of the things that attracted Pat to a life in community and after two years in the diocesan seminary in Scotland he chose to follow his vocation with the Society. That commitment to community life and family spirit were to remain hallmarks of Pat’s days in Zambia and Scotland and were a quality for which he was admired and respected.

In those days, due to wartime restrictions, British students remained at home and Pat found himself, one of the few, to make his Spiritual Year at Sutton Coldfield and to begin his studies at the nearby seminary of Birmingham Archdiocese. Further studies continued at Monteviot in Scotland but back again in England in 1947 he took his missionary oath at Rossington Hall. Ordination took place the following year together with his brother, George, at the newly consecrated cathedral of his home diocese, Motherwell.

Pat’s first appointment was not, as he had hoped, to Africa but to teach at the junior seminary in St Boswell's. He was to remain there as teacher and Bursar for eight years. Although popular with the students and always anxious to do his best for them Pat was not a naturally talented teacher and struggled with this first appointment. His students, among them the present Provincial Peter Smith and Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald, however, remember him as always having the interests of his students at heart and a man who gave them a good example in prayer and piety. Pat’s health problems were already beginning and by the time he left for Zambia in 1956 he had lost his hearing in one ear.

From then until 1969 Pat remained in Zambia serving in a number of parishes; among them Chalabesa, Kayambi and Mulilansolo; where he was appreciated for his piety, his dedication to his work and for his contributions to community life. Languages did not come easily to Pat and he struggled to learn Bemba but showed great perseverance. Unfortunately his health continued to decline.

A time of home service from 1969 to 1973 saw Pat first appointed as Superior of the Scottish junior seminary and later on promotion work in Rutherglen. He found the responsibilities of being Superior too much and was somewhat out of his depth with the young students. Promotion work suited him better and with his personal contacts he was often busy with missionary appeals and visits to schools where he spoke enthusiastically about his work in Zambia.
A further period of fifteen years was then spent in pastoral work in Zambia before Pat returned home definitively in 1988. Those long years in Zambia are best summed up by one of his superiors who wrote as Pat left: “Pat did not always have an easy time, but one cannot but admire his hard work and dedication . . . we are very grateful for his missionary presence in our midst” Others remember “a pastoral and community man”.

On his return to the province Pat accepted to become the Superior of the retirement community in Glasgow after being chosen by the community itself. Now dealing with men of his own age Pat came more into his own and rendered faithful service to the community for the next six years. He continued through his contacts to promote a missionary spirit and was always ready to help the local church and was especially fond of giving a hand in his brother’s parish where parishioners became very fond of him. At this time Pat was instrumental in founding a network of former pupils of the Society which took the name “The Pelicans”. It was his dream that they would not only spend time remembering their past glories as seminarians but also actively support the present work of the Society. And thanks to Pat’s encouragement this they did and continue to do for some of our confreres in Zambia. After all where else would Pat direct their efforts! It was a pleasure to see Pat at their annual reunions where he was treated with great respect and affection.

When he handed over his responsibilities and became a retired resident of the community Pat did this with dignity and grace confiding to friends that his stepping down was in the best interests of the community. The ill health that had dogged him throughout his life became worse and yet he accepted all this uncomplainingly and even with a sense of humour. The question:”Which hospital are you going to today, Pat?” was always met with a smile and sometimes the simple answer: “I don’t know, ask the bursar!” Of all his ailments that which caused Pat the most anxiety was his now serious hearing impediment making conversation in community very difficult for him and causing him to feel alienated from the community. However, on a one to one basis he became quite different and spoke interestingly and at length about his family and Zambia. Thankfully his eyesight remained relatively good and he was able to enjoy his reading. He was happy to offer small services to the community like looking after the sacristy and the liturgy. This he did very meticulously and woe betide anyone who forgot a particular saint’s day – especially a Scottish one! During these years Pat became closer than ever to his family and offered much support to them in their sicknesses and bereavements and derived great strength from them and their visits.

His final days were spent in the local hospital where his heart gradually gave out. Even here Pat continued to be a pastoral man and many of the staff were impressed by his interest in them, his faith, and his acceptance of his suffering. Such was his faith that death held no fear for him and he prayed for God to take him to Himself. This God did gently and quietly, after Pat had been anointed by his brother, on September 27th 2005.

In his funeral oration the Provincial reminded us of the words of Mother Theresa:
God doesn’t ask us to be successful, but He does ask us to be faithful.” Devotion to prayer and faithful service were the hallmarks of Pat’s missionary life.

Memories of Fr Boyd
by Eugene MacBride


I first met Fr Pat Boyd on 8th March 1950 at St Columba's.  The college was en fete in choro et refectorio to celebrate the 25th anniversary of his ordination to the priesthood of Father Walsh and his 50th of Father Bouniol.  It was my first day with the White Fathers.  My aunt who had brought me down from Glasgow had been spirited away and I think it was Pat took me upstairs to the big dormitory to show me my bed and my locker.

He told me 9 March would be a holiday.  I became the only one in the know, I think, but when Jimmy Johnston asked who had told me, I said, "The priest with the big nose."

Johnston let out a hoot: "Hawkeye!"

The odd thing is that after St Boswell's, I never heard Pat referred to again in terms of his rather prominent nose.

On the morning of 10 March, Walter Perry invited me to come down and see his rabbit snares.  As a result, we were late getting into Latin class and Pat tore Waller off a strip against a background of the beautiful Eildon Hills.  The class had been chanting Amabam, amabas, amabat as we walked in, the first Latin I had ever heard bar the noun 'stella'.

Pat took me as a Latin extravagant and taught me in his windowless room.

He also taught French and put it about that Scots boys would find French easier than the English or Irish because of the similarity of pronunciation, eg "ferme" and "ferm" !

One day a rather daft boy J.P. asked a very intelligent question: "How is it possible to go to a foreign country (eg in Africa) and understand what they are saying?"  Pat understood the query as a very stupid one from a very stupid boy but I for one could see what J.P. was getting at.  Pat blew-up and told him to shut up and stop being so silly.

Pat was in charge of the schola and used to take practice during manual work.  Ged Wynne was our organist.  I had been made one of the sacristans and used to fake--- beg Denis Shields behind Pat's back to swap his Liber for my sweeping brush and change places with me.  Denis was always eager but of course he did not dare.

Pat took a vivid interest in all things Pelican from our first reunion at Rutherglen in October 1992 right through to Dryburgh Abbey ten years later. 

He was one of those priests who tried to make everyone feel at home especially the women.  He was always on the look-out for ladies to read during Mass. 

I liked Pat very much and was sorry to hear of his death on 27th September 2005.  I was in France at the time and did not learn of his death until mid-October.

Requiescat.

Eugene

Nationality : British
Diocese:
Motherwell
Born
28-12-1919
Spititual Year
Sutton Coldfiel
03-10-1944
Taking of the Oath
Rossington Hall
29-07-1947
Ordination
Motherwell
25-05-1948

Date
Function
Location
Country
01-09-1948
Propagandist
St Boswells,Scotland
G.B.
25-10-1956
Arrive à
Mulanga,D.Mbala
Zambia
12-10-1957
  Chalabesa
 
13-08-1959
Séminaire
Kantensha
 
15-12-1960
  Chalabesa  
25-05-1961
  Kayambi  
11-01-1964
Grande Retraite
Villa Cavalletti
Italie
01-03-1964
Superior
Mulilansolo
Zambia
06-05-1969
Congé et Supérieur
Rutherglen,Scotland
G.B.
01-07-1973
Nommé: PE.73/7
  Zambia
07-11-1974
Curate
Kayambi,D.Mbala
 
01-01-1976
Curate
Ilondola
 
01-01-1980
Superior
Mulanga+Katibunga
 
06-03-1983
Session+retreat
Jerusalem  
01-01-1986
Vicaire
Mulanga,D.Mbala
Zambia
01-01-1987
Curé Mulanga,D.Mbala
 
01-09-1988
Superior
Rutherglen
G.B.
01-12-1994
Resident
Rutherglen  
01-10-1995
Supply work
Preston
 
29-09-1997
Residence
Rutherglen  
27-09-2005
Retour au Seigneur (85)
Glasgow
G.B.


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