GALLERY
PAGE 399


More memories from the Maurice Billingsley Archives (attic)



(source: Maurice Billingsley)


Serre Eyraud is the village where some of us were sent to learn French on
the high ground.  I seem to recall Peter Hurrell and Robbie Dempsey
were on the mountain opposite in a resort called Orcieres.


Return to Top

 


(source: Maurice Billingsley)

Serre Eyraud village


Return to Top


(source: Maurice Billingsley)

Grand Autane is the mountain behind Serre Eyraud where the village sheep were watched
over by the shepherd: we went up to meet him with the farmer we were staying with.



Return to Top


(source: Maurice Billingsley)


Archie is (the other) Michael Gallagher, taking an illicit dip in the lake.


Return to Top

 


(source: Maurice Billingsley)

1969 July - back home on the boat to Scotland from Larne


Return to Top

 



(source: Maurice Billingsley)

This was taken in November 69, on the beach at Nice.
John Halloran wanted a desert look for this picture,
but he didn't know about the old couple on the prom behind him.


Return to Top

 



(source: Maurice Billingsley)

The cloister door at Gap, onto the snow - from the
side of the cloister which was removed in later years.


Return to Top

 



(source: Maurice Billingsley)

The Virgen de Lourdes Robbie and I encountered on the way from Gap to Fribourg.

John Byrne could inform us about talgo and changing gauges, non?

John writes (November 2011): "Regarding Talgo trains and changing gauge.
RENFE – the Spanish railway company operates the vast majority of its services on
tracks of 1668mm gauge (about 5’51/2”), the same as Portugal. There are also tracks
of UIC standard - 1435mm gauge (4’81/2”) running through the middle of Spain (more or less)
served by AVE trains (TGV format) which have a maximum speed of 300 km/h.
All future developments will be to UIC standards.

Where trains run from France to Spain (and vice versa) there are two gauge changing
facilities one on the Mediterranean coast at Port Bou, the other on the Atlantic side at Irun
(though the latter is now little used). Talgo trains travel through Port Bou. Effectively, the coaches
are lifted off their wheelsets in a shed where a set of wheels of one gauge are rolled out and replaced by those of the other.  The whole operation is achieved in a matter of minutes.
"

Return to Top

 



(source: Maurice Billingsley)

This is also in Nice, when Peter Hurrell and I were working with Emmaus.