GALLERY
PAGE 158


The second page of pictures lent to us by Kevin Wiseman's sister, Celia.

Please excuse the order in which these photos are presented; I'm hoping that people who are more familiar
with the period will help me re-position items later (and, perhaps, be able to supply some informed commentary).

(Source : Celia, sister of Fr Kevin Wiseman)

Fr Kevin Wiseman. The following is an extract from the
tribute which you can read in the OBITUARIES section.

"Kevin Wiseman was born at Wakefield in Yorkshire on 10th February 1921. Two years later, the Wiseman family moved to Sheffield, famous for its stainless steel, where Kevin attended St. Wilfrid's Primary School and then went on to De La Salle College.

Like many people at that time, Kevin left school when he was 14, and went to work, helping his father who was in the printing trade. His work involved making deliveries at all kinds of places on his bicycle, and it was during this time, that Kevin met a White Father at the local Carmelite Convent. After a long time and much-soul searching, Kevin wrote to the White Fathers to say that he wanted to be a missionary. He was invited to come to the junior seminary at Bishop's Waltham, after the Christmas holidays in January 1936. So Kevin was back at a school desk again, but it was not easy. He had been put into a class with boys of his own age, but because he had been out of school for a while, he had a lot of catching up to do. Latin, especially, was a problem for him. After many difficulties, he eventually passed his Matriculation in 1938 and in September of that year was on his way to Autreppe in Belgium to begin his Philosophy.
"
Fr Wiseman in Africa.

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Fr Wiseman saying Mass in the open air while on the missions.
(Date and venue unknown).

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Fr Bernard Gaffney WF, as military chaplain.

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Fr Gaffney — date and venue unknown, at present.

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This is Fr Gaffney, again — at The Priory, this time.

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Brother Paddy with Fr Kevin Wiseman's father — at The Priory.

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Carl Wiseman (Kevin's brother) with Fr Leonard Marchant WF
at the old entrance to St Columba's. Date unknown.
Fr Marchant was the purported author of the "The White Fathers in Scotland",
which is available in full on Page 11 of the HISTORIES section.

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Bishop Joseph Blomjous, M. Afr. †

Bishop Emeritus of Mwanza

A priest for 58 years and a bishop for 46 years

Date Age Event Title
10 Feb 1908   Born Oisterwijk
29 Jun 1934 26.4 Ordained Priest Priest of Missionaries of Africa (White Fathers)
11 Apr 1946 38.2 Appointed Vicar Apostolic of Musoma-Maswa, Tanzania
11 Apr 1946 38.2 Appointed Titular Bishop of Bubastis
6 Oct 1946 38.7 Ordained Bishop Titular Bishop of Bubastis
25 Jun 1950 42.4 Appointed Vicar Apostolic of Mwanza, Tanzania
27 Jun 1950 42.4 Appointed Apostolic Administrator of Maswa, Tanzania
25 Mar 1953 45.1 Appointed Bishop of Mwanza, Tanzania
25 Mar 1953 45.1 Resigned Apostolic Administrator of Maswa, Tanzania
15 Oct 1965 57.7 Resigned Bishop of Mwanza, Tanzania
15 Oct 1965 57.7 Appointed Titular Bishop of Cabarsussi
13 May 1977 69.3 Resigned Titular Bishop of Cabarsussi
3 Nov 1992 84.7 Died Bishop Emeritus of Mwanza, Tanzania

(source : http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org)

When Fr Wiseman was teaching at the Nyegezi sminary (Tanzania) he met Bishop Blomjous, whom he described in his book "Destined for a Mission" as "My inspiration". He wrote "Bishop Blomjous, the Bishop of Mwanza, chose to live in Nyegezi. I learned a lot from him. He had great foresight. He eventually played an important part in Vatican II. . . . the Bishop realized my ordeal when I suffered from the sensation of being cooped up. He always arranged for me to go away at vacation time, maybe to see future seminarians, but in the process I made many good friends among the Maryknoll Fathers in the Musoma diocese. He felt for me and encouraged me to continue making sure that I had these breaks once a year."

(Fr Wiseman was understandably affected for many years by his experience in the p.o.w. camp and his terrible ordeal in solitary confinement awaiting execution).


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